Tag Archives: Kyoto Steampunk

How To Edit My NaNoWriMo Roughdraft?


by Lillian Csernica on January 16, 2019

2069836It’s time to clean up the NaNoWriMo novel. I have several intense scenes, some good action, and two or three potential plotlines. How do I clean this up? Where do I start?

First, I have to finish typing in all the handwritten material created during my coffeehouse marathons. That allows me a certain amount of editing, but mostly I just want to get all of the manuscript on disk. It’s comforting, really. I hadn’t realized just how much I did write and from so many different characters’ points of view.

Second, I need to figure out who the hero of my story is. Since this is meant to be a Kyoto Steampunk novel, the obvious choice would be Dr. William Harrington, main character of all but two of the seven short stories in the series. Who changes the most over the course of the story? Is it Dr. Harrington, or is it his daughter Madelaine?

(Yes, I did say seven. The latest Kyoto Steampunk short story, The Badger Epidemic, will appear in Next Stop on the #13, available at Clockwork Alchemy 2019!)

page_1_thumb_largeAt the Night of Writing Dangerously, we all received tote bags which included a copy of Save The Cat! Writes A Novel by Jessica Brody. This book is God’s gift to the novel writer, thanks to Ms. Brody’s skill at breaking down and explaining in detail the fifteen story beats that are essential to a strong, successful story. Given what Ms. Brody demonstrates, I know I face crucial questions in sifting through my roughdraft to find the moments that match some or all of those fifteen story beats.

Having done a bit of flailing around while I did my best to achieve my daily word quota, I’ve written a lot of material that could take the story in at least half a dozen directions. Lining up the scenes I’ve written in something approximating chronological order should point the way toward further complications and rising action. While I often work from plot outlines, this time I’ve been extrapolating from the events occurring in the Kyoto steampunk short stories. The consequences of some of those events are now catching up with Dr. Harrington, Madelaine, Constance, and Nurse Danforth.

The novel length has allowed me to introduce new characters, three human and three non-human. The humans are members of the British expatriate society in Kyoto, all of whom have some degree of power to affect the course of Dr. Harrington’s stay. Of the three non-human characters, two are earthly gods while the third is a monster of uncertain provenance. There are few things I enjoy more than squeezing poor Dr. Harrington between the pressures of Victorian social etiquette and the unfamiliar rules that govern the gods and monsters of Japan.

Third? I don’t know what will happen next. I’m just as excited to find out as I hope my readers will be!

300px-hyakki-yagyo-emaki_tsukumogami_1

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under classics, Conventions, creativity, doctors, editing, Family, fantasy, Fiction, Goals, historical fiction, history, Japan, Kyoto, legend, Lillian Csernica, publication, research, steampunk, sword and sorcery, travel, Writing

New Year, New Releases!


by Lillian Csernica on January 2 2019

chinese-new-year-feature

Happy New Year!

 

Two of my stories have found new homes which are now available.

In The Power Behind The Throne, Ti Song, Celestial Lady, First Daughter of the Emperor, longs for more than tea, embroidery, and a secluded life. When she discovers the secret of her brother’s success in battle, she knows it’s the key to her freedom.

 

 

 

firework-vector-illustration_k11106692

The Wheel of Misfortune has suddenly appeared on the streets of Kyoto, chasing Dr. William Harrington with lethal intent. With the help of the Abbot of Kiyomizudera, Dr. Harrington must go back to the early days of his career as a physician and right a wrong that has haunted him for ten long years.

 

Best wishes for 2019. May it bring us all much happiness and success!

wonderful-vector-fireworks-clip-art-vector_k14273573

7 Comments

Filed under Awards, creativity, doctors, fairy tales, Family, fantasy, Fiction, historical fiction, history, Japan, Kyoto, legend, Lillian Csernica, publication, steampunk, travel, Uncategorized, Writing

#atozchallenge: K is for Kannon


by Lillian Csernica on April 12, 2018

kannon1

japanvisitor.com

The Goddess of Mercy has many names. The most commonly known are Kwan Yin, Kanzeon Bosatsu, and Kannon. In the strictest sense she is a boddhisatva, a being who has achieved enlightenment and could merge with nirvana. Instead, she chooses to remain on earth and help others toward enlightenment.

8264ca970a68d375f16100d52007b1dd

br.pinterest.com

Throughout Japan there are many temples and shrines devoted to the Buddha and to the Shinto gods. Even when Kannon is not the main focus of a particular temple, you will often find a Kannon Hall where an image of the goddess resides.

Kiyomizudera, the Pure Water Temple, is a key location in the Kyoto Steampunk series. On its famous cypress veranda, Dr. Harrington meets Kannon herself.

9aca9e3caaf1bb370b3586a7ce0b657b

pinterest.com

 

 

 

 

1 Comment

Filed under #atozchallenge, Blog challenges, charity, fantasy, Fiction, historical fiction, history, Japan, Kyoto, legend, Lillian Csernica, steampunk, sword and sorcery, travel, Writing

#atozchallenge G is for Garden Party


by Lillian Csernica on April 7, 2018

g

One of the key elements of the Kyoto Steampunk series is writing each story from a different character’s point of view. Blown Sky High (Thirty Days Later) features a garden party presided over by Constance. This was an excellent opportunity to let the reader into her mind and see just how Constance is coping with the challenge of navigating through Kyoto’s expatriate society along with all the Japanese diplomats Dr. Harrington encounters.

A Victorian garden party is a lavish affair, held outdoors in a fine English garden full of stately oaks, manicured hedges, and an abundance of flowers. In 1880, did Kyoto provide the necessary landscape? Traditional trees in a Japanese garden included pine, bamboo, and plum. Because they do so well in winter, they symbolize steadfastness, perseverance, and resilience.

69a9ec0b5a0449e0b3bb11f38831b417

cn.hujiang.com

Springtime flowers in Kyoto include irises, azalea, hydrangea, plum blossoms, and waterlilies. Best of all are the roses. If you’re planning a visit to Kyoto, be sure to see the Kyoto Botanical Garden.

e152c1911b0a1af9197f0d4967ac296b-black-n-white-daughters

pinterest.com

Blown Sky High is an important story in the series. It’s more lighthearted, and it takes a look at the expectations placed upon “the fairer sex.” When events at the party take a sudden unexpected turn, Constance must look to Madelaine and her bluestocking habits to save the day. To learn more about Victorian women who redefined their roles in society, please read this excellent article.

 

flower2bdivider

labibliotecadeseshat.blogspot.com

 

 

 

5 Comments

Filed under #atozchallenge, Blog challenges, Family, family tradition, fantasy, Fiction, historical fiction, history, Humor, Japan, Kyoto, Lillian Csernica, marriage, mother, nature, parenting, research, steampunk, travel, Writing

#AtoZChallenge: A is for Amatsu Mikaboshi


by Lillian Csernica on April 1, 2018

Welcome to Day One of the A to Z Blog Challenge. This year I’ll be introducing you to the characters, settings, mythology, and other story elements of my Kyoto Steampunk series.

Amatsu Mikaboshi is the Japanese God of Chaos. Some people confuse him with the Christian Devil. This rather drastic case of mistaken identity is at the center of the first short story, In the Midnight Hour, which appears in Twelve Hours Later. When Dr. Harrington’s young daughter Madelaine falls ill with a fever, Nurse Danforth resorts to ancient superstition and goes to the crossroads at midnight, intent on making a deal with the Devil if that will save Madelaine’s life.

In the second short story, A Demon in the Noonday Sun (Twelve Hours Later), Dr. Harrington is looking after the Abbot of Kiyomizudera during the New Year’s festivities. Amatsu Mikaboshi appears, bent on punishing Dr. Harrington for what happens during the encounter with Nurse Danforth. Given Amatsu Mikaboshi’s power to hurl black fire, along with his very large sword, the doctor must act quickly to protect the Abbot from harm.

4f07bdc8b6563be4f2037197dc7c4dac

pinterest.com

 

 

 

5 Comments

Filed under #atozchallenge, Blog challenges, doctors, fairy tales, fantasy, Fiction, historical fiction, history, Japan, Kyoto, legend, Lillian Csernica, steampunk, Writing