Tag Archives: German

#atozchallenge X is for Xenophilia


by Lillian Csernica on April 27, 2019

atoz2019x

Welcome to one of the more unusual days in the A to Z Blog Challenge. X is a tricky letter.

My apologies for this post going up a bit later than the others. My in-laws from back east have been visiting and I got a bit behind.

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I have a confession to make: I am a Xenophile. This will come as no surprise to folks who have read this far in my A to Z. I love foreign people, places, and things.

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When did this start? I was in first grade. A family from Japan moved into the apartment across the big grassy yard from where I lived. Hiro Takahashi joined my class. Getting to know him, his sisters, and his parents gave me my first glimpse into a whole new world.

Bellydance

 

From age 16 to 18, I worked as a professional Turkish-Moroccan belly dancer. My teacher, a marvelous lady from Saragossa, Spain, taught me so much about her part of the world. I still have the coin belt made for me by a Turkish man. 144 diamond-shaped silver coins, all stamped with the Venus di Milo.

As my high school graduation gift, my father sent me to the Netherlands. I spent the summer with the family of the girl who had been my Physics lab partner on a student exchange program. While I was there I took a weekend bus tour to Paris, France. I am now all the more grateful for that trip, given that it allowed me to see Our Lady of Notre Dame cathedral in its full glory.

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amazon.com

My fiction has been translated into German and Italian. (Ship of Dreams became In the Spell of the Pirate.) I’m looking for someone to translate a novella into Japanese. If you know anybody, drop me a line, won’t you?

And of course I’ve had some adventures in Yokohama and Kyoto.

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theconversation.com

Why am I so attracted to the Other? People fascinate me. How they think, what they think, and why they think it. Just the single concept of life after death has given rise to so many different schools of thought. The pursuit of happiness involves such a broad spectrum of effort depending on how one defines happiness.

Writing allows me to take apart some aspect of life and put the pieces back together in a new way. Am I trying to make some sense of what I’ve experienced? Probably. Am I trying to bring order to a chaos that leaves me frightened and bewildered? Probably. It’s not all one-for-one, of course. By the time I get to the final edit of a story, the pieces of me I’ve used undergo quite a process of transformation.

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adrienneasher.com

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#AtoZChallenge: F is for Fujita-san


by Lillian Csernica on April 6, 2018

 

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wikivisually.com

Tanaka Fujimaro (田中 不二麿, 16 October 1845 – 8 September 1909) was a Japanese statesman and educator in Meiji period. On him I have based the character of Fujita Nobuhiro. Fujita-san is a member of the Japanese diplomatic corps assigned to Dr. Harrington as his translator. Fujita-san is most often present when Dr. Harrington pays a visit to Kiyomizudera to check on his patient, the Abbot.

Fujita-san is a good example of a member of the samurai class who weathered the Meiji Restoration successfully. Literate, educated, from a good family, Fujita-san’s talent for languages has made him well-suited for dealing with the abundance of foreigners present in Japan. It has not yet come out in the stories, but Fujita-san speaks not only Japanese and English but French and German as well.

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pinterest.com

 

 

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Filed under #atozchallenge, Blog challenges, fantasy, Fiction, historical fiction, history, Japan, Kyoto, Lillian Csernica, research, steampunk, travel, Writing