Tag Archives: folk art

How Not to Build a Gingerbread House


by Lillian Csernica on December 19, 2018

 

 

Hi there. Right now I’m spread thinner than Nutella on the last three pieces of shortbread. Mom will be out of the hospital the day after Christmas. Tomorrow I have three appointments, then my younger son takes his first test for a new belt rank in tae kwon do. And then there’s all the Christmas prep to keep doing.

I need a laugh, and by some strange bit of good fortune I happened across something I wrote years ago at this same time of year. For your Yuletide entertainment, I present it to you now.

9b0c9c79b6cb92a49f84e8d15856ce9e

thismommycooks.com

How Not to Build a Gingerbread House

Never ever attempt to make a gingerbread house with somebody who’s never seen one before and yet, thanks to his control freak tendencies, immediately mutates into an expert on the art.

It’s difficult to sustain an intelligent argument about the precise technique of using industrial strength icing to glue peppermint candies, gummi bears, M&Ms, and gumdrops to the various flat and angled surfaces of a gingerbread house. Believe me, we tried. Too much icing. Not enough icing. The grouping of the gumdrops on the roof lacked the right balance of colors. The little candy canes lining the walk to the front door weren’t maintaining their lines with military precision. And the windows. This is where things almost got violent. Making window panes out of pretzel sticks might seem like no big deal, but when you’re dealing with a man who thinks we should have been using a carpenter’s balance, you’ve entered into a whole new realm of the bizarre.

Then came the argument over building the chimney out of Pez candies, licorice bricks, Jolly Rancher cinnamon bites, or graham crackers iced in proper brick and mortar formations. I’m not much for drinking, even during the holidays, but by the time I was about halfway through this delightful holiday pastime, I was ready to forget the eggnog and go straight for the brandy.

At last our masterpiece was complete. It resembled nothing so much as a perfect 3D schematic of what would happen if the two of us EVER tried to share the same living quarters. The yard was a wreck, green icing spilling onto the graham cracker walkway like rank weeds erupting through broken concrete. The cast off wrappings of Hershey’s Kisses, peanut butter cups, and Lifesavers lay strewn across the porch, revealing us for the white trash we really were. The snowman in the front yard listed like the drunken uncle at the wedding reception. It was a mercy that we never had to bother with the inside of the house. I shudder to think what horrors would have been dissolving in there. Gummi coke bottles piled in the corners…silver foil gum wrappers wadded up in the little black licorice fireplace…cotton candy webs hanging from the corners of the ceilings…. It would be just too heartbreaking.

a446b75101e2c7d651853784c6b0c272

m.imgr.com

I can’t recall now what became of that gingerbread house. I know it sat on my kitchen table for some weeks during that holiday season. And as for the man himself, my partner in committing this crime of both taste and art? No, it was not in fact my husband. This was another man, whose story must wait for another time.  This fellow is no longer among the living, so that time will probably be Halloween.

 

617ae493a429913d31cd929f25ddb7ef

thequeenofhalloween.blogspot.com

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under chocolate, Christmas, classics, creativity, Family, family tradition, fantasy, Food, frustration, Halloween, Humor, Lillian Csernica, perspective, therapy

F is for Folk Art


by Lillian Csernica on April 7, 2016

 

MEXICO

ceramic-wall-sculpture-mexican-folk-art-fantastical-eclipse-novica-mexico-868bc3b3bda74f34b277972e698879f0

One of the aspects of traveling in Mexico I really enjoy is the vibrant color to be found in the clothing, the flowers, and especially in the art.  I’m a big fan of El Dia de Los Muertos, the Day of the Dead.  The folk art and pop art imagery that has arisen from the traditional El Dia De Los Muertos decorations, sugar skulls, etc. is, if you’ll pardon the expression, positively alive with color!

a005f0507c7fe433cbdb013dbca8899a

 

BELGIUM

I passed through Belgium on my way from the Netherlands to France.  That took me through the northern part of the country.  Belgium is lovely, and in the summer it’s quite sunny and green.  Most of the tourism in Belgium happens in the south, so I myself was something of an oddity as a lone American teenager riding along with a bus tour of Dutch folks!  You know how much I love history, so here are some fascinating facts about Belgian folk art and handicrafts.

kgrhqvlefhvrvuezbr8coyev4q60_1

From Countries and Their Cultures:

Wooden shoes called sabots (Walloon) or klompen (Flemish) were traditional footwear for men, women, and children. Like the people of Belgium, they wore these shoes outdoors; they were left by the door when entering the house. Some immigrants brought the knowledge and the tools for making wooden shoes with them from Belgium. Belgian Americans who could afford them wore wooden shoes decorated with carvings of leaves and flowers. Children sometimes used their wooden shoes as skates or sleds. The early immigrants were usually clothed in homespun cloth and caps. Belgian lace, the fine handwork which originated in sixteenth-century Flanders, was often used to trim religious vestments, altar cloths, handkerchiefs, table cloths, napkins, and bed linens. This fine art was practiced by Belgian immigrants in every area of settlement in the United States. When celebrating the Kermiss, which is a Belgian harvest festival, the organizers of the Kermiss wore red, white, and blue sashes while leading the people of the community in a procession to the church to give thanks.

Pennsylvania, UNITED STATES

hexlegendaryl

Pennsylvania Dutch folk art is often referred to as “hex signs.”  People who live on working farms have a lot to be worried about, from crop failure to cattle disease to the illnesses that plague human beings.  It’s no wonder these good luck charms and protective symbols came into being.  Painting one’s barn led naturally to decorating it as well.  There is some controversy about whether or not these hex signs have any actual talismanic power.

My mother-in-law lives in New Jersey.  At one time she was right across the Delaware from Bucks County, Pennsylvania.  On one of our visits to her, my husband and I bought this particular hex sign:

il_570xn-295315948

Doves, heart, tulip = Peace, Love, Faith

 

 

 JAPAN

kokeshi3

Kokeshi dolls are everywhere in Japan.  On the Sannen-zaka, the outdoor shopping mall that leads to Kiyomizudera, there were several shops that sold kokeshi dolls.  The variety is staggering!  I was so amazed by all the sizes and the designs I could not decide on a favorite.  I had much the same dilemma when looking over all the maneki neko, or good luck cats, available.  (Upon reflection I do wish I’d bought the good luck cat lying there on its back as if asking for a tummy rub!)

The history of kokeshi dolls

 

 

8 Comments

Filed under art show, artists, Blog challenges, cats, creativity, fairy tales, Family, family tradition, history, Japan, Kyoto, legend, Lillian Csernica, love, marriage, memoirs, nature, research, travel, Writing