Category Archives: research

How to Keep Writing When Depression Strikes


by Lillian Csernica on June 6, 2017

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Yes, it’s that time again. Life’s daily stressors combined with two or three sudden unwelcome surprises have left me waging guerilla warfare against my own depression. This comes at a particularly bad time. I have writing opportunities to make use of, commitments to fulfill, as well as organizing the celebration of my younger son’s graduation from high school.

These things are very difficult to accomplish when it takes a massive effort of will just to drag myself out of bed every morning.

I am not alone. You are not alone. We are not alone in suffering the crippling effects of depression, whether temporary or chronic. In keeping with the Buddhist philosophy of “taking positive action for the good,” I offer this list of helpful ideas.

Why Writers Are Prone to Depression

Writing Your Way Out of Depression

Neurological Similarities Between Successful Writers and the Mentally Ill.

7 Ways to Help You Write When You’re Depressed.

The Writer and Depression (Chuck Wendig)

The important thing is to keep writing. Make lists. Brainstorm. Letters to your imaginary friends. Anything that keeps the pen moving. Suspend judgment and blow off the Internal Editor. Just write. One day at a time. Just write.

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What do you do when depression gets you down? What helps you keep the pen moving? I would love to hear your ideas and coping strategies. Let’s see how many answers come in before Friday, midnight. I will roll the appropriate die, the winner shall be chosen, and that winner will receive a free ebook copy of either The Writer’s Spellbook or The Fright Factory.

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Filed under creativity, Depression, editing, fantasy, Fiction, frustration, Goals, historical fiction, homework, memoirs, neurodiversity, publication, research, romance, science fiction, steampunk, sword and sorcery, therapy, Writing

About that Subtitle….


by Lillian Csernica on June 1, 2017

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Now that I’m home again after the big holiday weekend, I’ve been practicing some stress management by looking through the Amazon giveaways. I’m seeing a lot of books.

I’m also seeing a lot of subtitles. Long, cumbersome, unnecessary subtitles. Heaven knows we all want to win big in the SEO Sweepstakes. Trying to stuff a bunch of keywords into your title, subtitle, and series name is more likely to turn a reader off.

Here is an example of a rather lengthy subtitle:

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Mr. Duswalt might have chosen to say Surviving X Years Touring with Guns N’ Roses. One can assume he felt the marketability of the book would be enhanced by all those details.

Still, tl;dr can be an important factor.

A subtitle is a lot like a prologue. If your story needs one to help the reader figure out what’s happening, then there’s something wrong with your story. Much like an adverb props up a weak verb, a subtitle is propping up a weak title and/or cover art that really doesn’t sell the story’s genre.

Yes, you can have a subtitle if the book is one installment in an ongoing series or you have the same main character. Even so, keep it simple. Book 12 in the Marybelle O’Shaughnessy Cozy Culinary Criminal Capers with Cats is a little much!

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Where You Should Be This Weekend


by Lillian Csernica on May 26, 2017

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It’s that time again! Convention season is well underway, and Memorial Day Weekend is a high point. This weekend you can find me at two, count ’em, TWO conventions!

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Clockwork Alchemy:

Saturday in particular promises to be a blast.

11:30 to 1 p.m. — Steampunk DIY! This year we’ll be making earrings. Get it it gear (ho ho ho) and join us!

4 p.m. to 5 p.m. — Steampunk, Satire, and Society

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BayCon:

Sunday is my busy day!

1:40 p.m. (Connect 5)  My reading! Come listen to an exciting excerpt from my newest Kyoto Steampunk story, “The Wheel of Misfortune.”

4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. (Synergy 1) Historical Writing

5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. (Connect 1) The Truth About Stuff!

I’ve come up with some rather unique items in the way of promo swag. Find me and see what heights of creative memorabilia could be yours!

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The Naked Truth


by Lillian Csernica on May 17, 2017

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I recently got a phone call that is one of those phone calls you really don’t want to get.

I’d gone in for a mammogram. Not fun, but an important part of keeping ahead of anything that might show up. Went there, did that, got it over with for another year.

Or so I thought.

Got a phone call from the imaging center telling me the doctor there wanted me to come back in for some additional views on my right side. “What does that mean?” I asked. “Is something wrong?”

Never ask the people at the front desk these questions. They don’t know, and they can’t tell you even if they do know.

So I made a follow-up appointment for today. Was I nervous? Hell yes I was nervous.

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The imaging center front office is very cheerful with all the pink items associated with breast cancer awareness. There were a few nervous-looking women in the waiting room along with some very bored men. I’ve been in a lot of medical waiting rooms over the years, some for myself, some for the boys. Rarely have I experienced an atmosphere of everybody trying so hard to ignore the reasons why we were all there.

My turn came, I suited up in the bright pink gown, and the mammogram tech got those images. She took them to the doctor there, who would decide if further imaging would be required.

During that ten minutes or so, I kept myself occupied by telling myself to calm down, to stop imagining horrible outcomes and scaring myself, to have faith.

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Another tech appeared, this one in charge of ultrasound. Yes, the doctor wanted further images. So I followed that tech into the large closet where they do the ultrasound exams. For once the ultrasound goo was not cold. Thank God for small favors.

The ultrasound exam went on and on  and on. Time has no meaning when you’re lying there in whatever position you’re put in, feeling your muscles start to cramp while being too scared to move or say anything for fear of messing up the exam and having to start all over again.

At last those images were complete. That tech went off to show them to the doctor. I did my best to remove all the goo and stay calm while this new level of anxiety jacked up my adrenaline level.

The doctor’s verdict? The mass they’d wanted a closer look at turned out to be nothing more than a water cyst about the size of a small ball bearing.

Thank you, God. It turned out to be nothing, but it might have been something. Now I know and the doctors know and it’s all good for another year.

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Reblog: 20 Inspiring Pinterest Boards for Writers


by Lillian Csernica on May 13, 2017

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Looking for inspiration? Technique? Some solidarity and comfort? Somewhere on this list you’ll find what you need, along with so much more. Enjoy!

 

Source: 20 Inspiring Pinterest Boards for Writers

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W is for Waterfalls (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 27, 2017

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Beautiful glitter Art Nouveau waterfall pendant by Georges Fouquet. It is made in yellow gold, with small diamond accents and enamel with a baroque pearl drop.

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Louis Comfort Tiffany, Landscape with Waterfall. Stained glass,1920,art nouveau, teaching,education,analysis and study of the picture and style,art,culture,painting.

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Four tier Waterfall Chandelier by Hector Guimard, early 1900s.

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Art nouveau fountain, Paris France.

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The Waterfall Tiara created by Chaumet in 1899. Elements fashioned to imitate sprays of water, set with diamonds, support pear-shaped diamonds with tremble with every movement. Most likely a silver wedding anniversary gift from the Grand Duke Vladimir to the grand duchess.

 

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U is for Unlucky (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 25, 2017

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The number thirteen produces strong reactions in people. Many believe the number is unlucky. Much to my surprise, I’ve discovered why many other people insist on believing thirteenth brings good luck. For excellent examples of both sides, click here.

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“Lucky” 13  heart charm. Silver and enamel. Germany circa 1900.

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18k gold decorated with papyrus leaves and platinum set with tiny rose-cut diamonds. France, circa 1900.

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Rose wreath charm with “lucky” 13 inside. Sterling silver, from France.

Sterling silver crescent moon “lucky” 13 charm. Victorian.

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18k gold with diamond, ruby, and aquamarine. Late 19th Century.

 

 

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R is for Rings (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 21, 2017

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14k pearl and large cabochon moonstone ring. 1915, Brandt and Son.

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A bee/wasp ring. Plique-a-jour enamel, diamond, and peridot.

Rose quartz cabochon set in sterling silver leaves. This ring is very unusual in that rose quartz is an uncommon stone in art nouveau jewelry.

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From Lang Antiques:

“A placid pale-blue elongated oval aquamarine floats inside a fanciful and feminine openwork frame accented with twinkling diamond crescents and a pair of golden flowers. This extra-lovely and highly individualistic jewel measures 1 1/16 inches long by just over 5/8 inch wide.”

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Egyptian Revival subset of art nouveau. 18k yellow gold, polychrome enamel, opal and rose-cut diamonds.

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Georges Fouquet. Gold, enamel, opal, and pearl.

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A gold and enamel “Fuschia” ring by Rene Lalique.

 

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Q is for Queen (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 20, 2017

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Queen Matilde of Belgium’s diamond art nouveau brooch.

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1907 Diadem by Cartier Paris. Ordered by Princess Marie Bonaparte for her marriage to Prince George of Greece and Denmark.

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After the Empress Josephine was divorced from Napoleon, she ordered this tiara from Faberge in 1890. The briolette diamonds were a gift to her from Tsar Alexander I.

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Chaumet, 1908. Made for the Marquise de Talhouet. Classic scrolling foliate tiara. A larger, cushion-cut diamond sits atop the large circular diamonds at the center.

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Imperial Russian heart brooch by Faberge, circa 1895. An asymmetrical heart frames a gold trellis work, each intersection set with a brilliant-cut diamond, all surmounted by a diamond-set forget-me-not.

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Faberge strikes again! An openwork trellis of white gold set with truly stunning emeralds. The choker can be detached from the collar, allowing the two necklaces to be worn separately.

 

 

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N is for Names


by Lillian Csernica on April 17, 2017

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Today I present to you the masters of the exquisite treasures produced during the Art Nouveau/Jugendstil movement.

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Peter Carl Faberge (Russia)

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Georges Fouquet (France)

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Emile Galle (France)

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Rene Lalique (France)

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Archibald Knox (England)

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Gustav Klimt (Austria)

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Sir Arthur Liberty (England)

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Carl Hermann (Germany)

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Alphonse Mucha (Czech Republic)

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Louis Comfort Tiffany (United States)

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Philippe Wolfers (Belgium)

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