Category Archives: research

W is for Waterfalls (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 27, 2017

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Beautiful glitter Art Nouveau waterfall pendant by Georges Fouquet. It is made in yellow gold, with small diamond accents and enamel with a baroque pearl drop.

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Louis Comfort Tiffany, Landscape with Waterfall. Stained glass,1920,art nouveau, teaching,education,analysis and study of the picture and style,art,culture,painting.

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Four tier Waterfall Chandelier by Hector Guimard, early 1900s.

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Art nouveau fountain, Paris France.

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The Waterfall Tiara created by Chaumet in 1899. Elements fashioned to imitate sprays of water, set with diamonds, support pear-shaped diamonds with tremble with every movement. Most likely a silver wedding anniversary gift from the Grand Duke Vladimir to the grand duchess.

 

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U is for Unlucky (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 25, 2017

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The number thirteen produces strong reactions in people. Many believe the number is unlucky. Much to my surprise, I’ve discovered why many other people insist on believing thirteenth brings good luck. For excellent examples of both sides, click here.

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“Lucky” 13  heart charm. Silver and enamel. Germany circa 1900.

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18k gold decorated with papyrus leaves and platinum set with tiny rose-cut diamonds. France, circa 1900.

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Rose wreath charm with “lucky” 13 inside. Sterling silver, from France.

Sterling silver crescent moon “lucky” 13 charm. Victorian.

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18k gold with diamond, ruby, and aquamarine. Late 19th Century.

 

 

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Filed under #atozchallenge, Art Nouveau, artists, Blog challenges, creativity, family tradition, history, nature, research

R is for Rings (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 21, 2017

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14k pearl and large cabochon moonstone ring. 1915, Brandt and Son.

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A bee/wasp ring. Plique-a-jour enamel, diamond, and peridot.

Rose quartz cabochon set in sterling silver leaves. This ring is very unusual in that rose quartz is an uncommon stone in art nouveau jewelry.

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From Lang Antiques:

“A placid pale-blue elongated oval aquamarine floats inside a fanciful and feminine openwork frame accented with twinkling diamond crescents and a pair of golden flowers. This extra-lovely and highly individualistic jewel measures 1 1/16 inches long by just over 5/8 inch wide.”

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Egyptian Revival subset of art nouveau. 18k yellow gold, polychrome enamel, opal and rose-cut diamonds.

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Georges Fouquet. Gold, enamel, opal, and pearl.

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A gold and enamel “Fuschia” ring by Rene Lalique.

 

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Filed under #atozchallenge, Art Nouveau, artists, Blog challenges, classics, creativity, history, nature, research

Q is for Queen (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 20, 2017

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Queen Matilde of Belgium’s diamond art nouveau brooch.

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1907 Diadem by Cartier Paris. Ordered by Princess Marie Bonaparte for her marriage to Prince George of Greece and Denmark.

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After the Empress Josephine was divorced from Napoleon, she ordered this tiara from Faberge in 1890. The briolette diamonds were a gift to her from Tsar Alexander I.

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Chaumet, 1908. Made for the Marquise de Talhouet. Classic scrolling foliate tiara. A larger, cushion-cut diamond sits atop the large circular diamonds at the center.

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Imperial Russian heart brooch by Faberge, circa 1895. An asymmetrical heart frames a gold trellis work, each intersection set with a brilliant-cut diamond, all surmounted by a diamond-set forget-me-not.

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Faberge strikes again! An openwork trellis of white gold set with truly stunning emeralds. The choker can be detached from the collar, allowing the two necklaces to be worn separately.

 

 

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N is for Names


by Lillian Csernica on April 17, 2017

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Today I present to you the masters of the exquisite treasures produced during the Art Nouveau/Jugendstil movement.

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Peter Carl Faberge (Russia)

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Georges Fouquet (France)

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Emile Galle (France)

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Rene Lalique (France)

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Archibald Knox (England)

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Gustav Klimt (Austria)

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Sir Arthur Liberty (England)

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Carl Hermann (Germany)

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Alphonse Mucha (Czech Republic)

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wikipedia.org

Louis Comfort Tiffany (United States)

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Philippe Wolfers (Belgium)

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Filed under #atozchallenge, Art Nouveau, artists, classics, creativity, fairy tales, family tradition, fantasy, history, nature, research, travel

B is for Bat (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 3, 2017

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Of the many popular motifs in Art Nouveau jewelry, I have to say bats are among the strangest. Flowers? Sure. Insects? OK. Abstract geometric designs? No problem. But bats?

Thanks to the erudite Jewelry Nerd, you will find some possible answers here.

There are plenty of examples of this particular critter done in various precious metals and gems. I’ve included only a few. I guess the fashionable ladies of La Belle Epoque must have included some Goths!

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Bat pin of plique-a-jour enamel, pearl, diamond, with ruby eyes, 18k gold, 4″ wing span

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Bracelet by Philippe and Marcel Wolfers.

From 1stdibs.com: “A superb and iconic art nouveau portrayal of a Parisian goddess of the Demi-Monde. She has style roots going back to the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. The very revealing décolleté, flowing hair, bat wings and diamond Aurora head dress suggestively alludes to pagan pleasures and entertainments of the night, the practitioners only heading home with the dawn.”

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Art Nouveau Japanese Inlaid Damascene “Bat and Crescent” necklace in gold and silver.

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Art nouveau Czech bat pin with vaseline rhinestones.

Yes, that’s right. Vaseline rhinestones. Prior to the Cold War, jewelers could use uranium in the creation of certain types of art glass. The results resembled the appearance of the petroleum jelly as it was produced at that time.

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The Wonders of Digital Fiction Publishing


by Lillian Csernica on March 17, 2017

 

Michael Willis is a  lovely man who treats writers with respect. I’ve sold three short stories to DFP so far, and I look forward to submitting more work there in the future.

David Tallerman, another DFP writer, has encouraged me to share his excellent blog post on the merits of working with DFP.

10 Reasons You Should Be Submitting to Digital Fiction Publishing

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Reblog: Tabula Candida


And that’s why I need my morning tea: I’m looking for my brain.

via Brain — Tabula Candida

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5 Favorite Guides to Get Writing Again


by Lillian Csernica on February 28, 2017

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Writing is hard. We all know that. Some days we get sidetracked by avoidance behavior. Some days we procrastinate out of laziness or confusion about the story. Some days we’re just plain stuck.

Today I’m having one of those days. Here I sit, working on a blog post, when I’d meant to be making progress on my latest short story. Well, at least it’s productive avoidance behavior, right?

In the spirit of solidarity with my fellow struggling writers, I offer this list full of tips, information, and excellent methods to restart the writing engines. Enjoy!

Four Ways to Rediscover Your Passion for Writing

Nailing Scene Structure

100 Prompts for Writing about Yourself

Stop Putting Off Writing: 9 Experts’ Solutions

End Writing Procrastination Now

 

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The Perils of Writing Short Fiction


by Lillian Csernica on February 21, 2017

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Opportunity cost. Cost/benefit analysis. Return on investment.

I remember these terms from my Economics and Accounting classes. Little did I know I would one day be applying them to which writing projects I chose to pursue.

So far, the Flower Maiden Saga has inspired me to write three consecutive novels. The farther I go in editing and polishing Book One for the big agent pitch, the more of the causes and consequences of the main storyline I see. The core plots for Books Four and Five have already presented themselves.

This is wonderful. I’m excited about all of it. The thing is, my first love is writing short stories. Reading short stories in Asimov’s and Weird Tales and my English Lit. classes made me want to become a writer. The first time I walked into a bookstore and picked up a copy of The Year’s Best Horror Stories XXI and saw my name on the table of contents right there with Ramsey Campbell and Ed Gorman, I very nearly exploded with happiness.

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Short stories are great, but novels are where the money is. I’ve heard that many times. Novels take a while to write and a while to polish and package for publication. Not so with short stories. Short stories will get your name out there and keep it out there.

These are the five main perils of writing short fiction:

  1. Why waste a good idea on a short story? These days it’s all about writing novels. Give the readers what they want, over and over again. Build that brand. Make more money. Fine. If that’s what you want, go for it. Bear in mind there is much to be said for the art and craft of the short story. Hemingway’s “The Killers” and “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” remain vivid in my mind thirty-five years after I read them in high school.
  2. Short stories are often just one shots. That one shot might be brilliant, but then you have to go write another story. Is that one brilliant story continuing to earn royalties or selling well as a Kindle Single? I visit various writers’ groups online, and I find the emphasis on money to be disheartening. Short stories can be built into a novel. One of my favorite fantasy novels, A Bait of Dreams by Jo Clayton, started out as three short stories that appeared in Asimov’s.
  3. It can be difficult to pack a complex story idea into a limited word count. On the other hand, doing so can result in a stronger story. When I wrote “Fallen Idol,” my first short story sale, I got so caught up in all the research and characters and how-to books’ advice I thought I could rise to the challenge of writing a real novel. Fortunately, I had an attack of reality. All the research and ideas imploded, resulting in a much stronger short story.
  4. Unless you’re selling to the top professional markets, short fiction doesn’t pay much. If you’re sending out enough stories to generate an acceptable amount of sales, way to go! That’s not easy to do, even for the Big Names. I will say that anthologies that pay up front then give you a cut of the royalties can provide some worthwhile income.
  5. Here’s the Peril that cuts to the heart of what it means to be a writer. Are you going to write about what you want to write about, or are you going to write what you think will sell to the markets where you want your work to appear? The Digital Age has opened up a whole lot of  markets. They may not pay much. They may not pay at all. Still, you can get your words out there. Targeting a particular market is a perfectly reasonable career strategy. My first sale to Weird Tales was another day for joyful explosion.

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It comes down to those basic questions we all ask our main characters:

What do you want?

How badly do you want it?

What are you willing to give up in order to get it?

When you’ve answered these three questions, you will be on your way to navigating through the perilous process of telling the stories only you can tell.

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