Category Archives: Lillian Csernica

W is for Waterfalls (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 27, 2017

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Beautiful glitter Art Nouveau waterfall pendant by Georges Fouquet. It is made in yellow gold, with small diamond accents and enamel with a baroque pearl drop.

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Louis Comfort Tiffany, Landscape with Waterfall. Stained glass,1920,art nouveau, teaching,education,analysis and study of the picture and style,art,culture,painting.

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Four tier Waterfall Chandelier by Hector Guimard, early 1900s.

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Art nouveau fountain, Paris France.

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The Waterfall Tiara created by Chaumet in 1899. Elements fashioned to imitate sprays of water, set with diamonds, support pear-shaped diamonds with tremble with every movement. Most likely a silver wedding anniversary gift from the Grand Duke Vladimir to the grand duchess.

 

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T for Tiara (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 24, 2017

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A cyclamen tiara by Faberge. In the late 19th Century it was quite fashionable to have tiaras that could also be worn as necklaces.

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House/Maker Henri Sandoz Period Art Nouveau circa 1900. Origin Paris, France. Setting Yellow and green gold, unsigned.

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A belle epoque diamond and pearl aigrette, circa 1900, by Cartier. A tiara that can be hung with either sixteen pear-shaped diamonds and sixteen similarly shaped natural pearls. Though the diamond version does have an extra pear-shaped diamond that hangs down to rest on the forehead. (Don’t you just love having that kind of flexibility in your bling?)

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A unusual belle epoque tiara, 1900, by Boucheron. In some ways a very Art Nouveau design, with large diamond leaves intertwining sinuously with diamond berries.

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Gold, enamel, and mother of pearl. Made by A & J Smith, United Kingdom, circa 1900.

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Gold, enamel, pearls and diamonds. Rene Lalique, France, circa 1900.

 

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S is for Snakes (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 22, 2017

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Gold, enamel, emerald, and diamond. French, 1900.

Art Nouveau 18kt Gold, Opal, and Demantoid Garnet Necklace, designed as writhing serpents with five bezel-set opals, the central opal with demantoid garnet accents.

Double snake belt buckle in sterling silver, set with a garnet.

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By Philippe Wolfers. Belgium, 1898.

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Snake hand bag. Chased silver, antelope skin, silk, and metallic thread. Rene Lalique, circa 1903.

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A serpent drinking from a basin. 18k gold, platinum, emerald, and diamond.

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A female profile bordered by serpents. Plique-a-jour enamel, gold, opal, and pearl. Rene Lalique, circa 1900.

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Art nouveau gold and enamel ear pendants by Rene Lalique, 1900-1902.

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Medusa paperweight. Rene Lalique.

 

 

 

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P is for Pocket Watch (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 19, 2017

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Swiss Gold Diamond and Pearl Pendant Watch circa 1905.

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Gold, cabochon emerald, diamond and green enamel lapel watch. Marcus & Co., circa 1900.

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Museum Quality Enamel and Gem set Lapel Watch by Haas Neveux. 18K Yellow Gold with Fine enamel, gold chasing and accented with numerous Rose cut Diamonds. Stem set Jeweled Nickel lever movement. Porcelain Dial with sunk seconds chapter and Gold hands. Matching case and Movement Numbers and also having the name of Boston Retailer Smith Patterson & co engraved on the movement.

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Gold and enamel lapel watch, circa 1900.

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Art Nouveau 18kt Gold, Enamel, and Diamond Open Face Pendant Watch, the case with enamel flowers and rose-cut diamonds, the cuvette with guilloche enamel, hammered gold accents, the white enamel dial with Arabic numeral indicators and subsidiary seconds dial, stem-wind and stem-set, 27 mm, and suspended from a conforming watch pin, total lg. 2 1/2 in.

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Antique art nouveau Moon Celestial Pocket Watch holder stand. Solid bronze.

 

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O is for Owl (Art Nouveau – #AtoZChallenge)


by Lillian Csernica on April 18, 2017

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Owl pendant in gold, silver, and enamel, clutching a pearl. Faberge, Moscow, Russia, 1916-1917.

 

Green and rose enamel. The gemstone is likely amethyst.

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Ladies’ evening bag. Leather with textured detailing back and front. Banded agate eyes with rubies surrounding them. Diamond-set beak and claws.

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Hair comb by Paul and Henri Vever, circa 1900. Honey-colored horn embellished with jewels.

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Stomacher brooch by Cartier, 1907. Platinum, diamonds, eight sapphires.

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Art Nouveau owl bookends.

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French art nouveau brooch by Gautrait. Enameled gold, diamond, sapphire and opal.

 

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The A to Z Blog Challenge Theme Reveal!


by Lillian Csernica on March 21, 2017

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Once again I shall be celebrating the arrival of Spring by participating in the A to Z Blog Challenge. This will be my fourth year, and I look forward to even more fun and meeting new friends.

In past years, my themes have included Travel Adventures, Unusual Items Made of Chocolate, and Bad Sword & Sorcery Movies.

This year I will be bringing you eye candy taken from another one of my secret passions:

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Jewelry, housewares, and a few other surprises, at least one for every letter of the alphabet! I’ll be looking forward to your comments!

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The Wonders of Digital Fiction Publishing


by Lillian Csernica on March 17, 2017

 

Michael Willis is a  lovely man who treats writers with respect. I’ve sold three short stories to DFP so far, and I look forward to submitting more work there in the future.

David Tallerman, another DFP writer, has encouraged me to share his excellent blog post on the merits of working with DFP.

10 Reasons You Should Be Submitting to Digital Fiction Publishing

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Reblog: Tabula Candida


And that’s why I need my morning tea: I’m looking for my brain.

via Brain — Tabula Candida

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5 Favorite Guides to Get Writing Again


by Lillian Csernica on February 28, 2017

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Writing is hard. We all know that. Some days we get sidetracked by avoidance behavior. Some days we procrastinate out of laziness or confusion about the story. Some days we’re just plain stuck.

Today I’m having one of those days. Here I sit, working on a blog post, when I’d meant to be making progress on my latest short story. Well, at least it’s productive avoidance behavior, right?

In the spirit of solidarity with my fellow struggling writers, I offer this list full of tips, information, and excellent methods to restart the writing engines. Enjoy!

Four Ways to Rediscover Your Passion for Writing

Nailing Scene Structure

100 Prompts for Writing about Yourself

Stop Putting Off Writing: 9 Experts’ Solutions

End Writing Procrastination Now

 

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The Perils of Writing Short Fiction


by Lillian Csernica on February 21, 2017

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Opportunity cost. Cost/benefit analysis. Return on investment.

I remember these terms from my Economics and Accounting classes. Little did I know I would one day be applying them to which writing projects I chose to pursue.

So far, the Flower Maiden Saga has inspired me to write three consecutive novels. The farther I go in editing and polishing Book One for the big agent pitch, the more of the causes and consequences of the main storyline I see. The core plots for Books Four and Five have already presented themselves.

This is wonderful. I’m excited about all of it. The thing is, my first love is writing short stories. Reading short stories in Asimov’s and Weird Tales and my English Lit. classes made me want to become a writer. The first time I walked into a bookstore and picked up a copy of The Year’s Best Horror Stories XXI and saw my name on the table of contents right there with Ramsey Campbell and Ed Gorman, I very nearly exploded with happiness.

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Short stories are great, but novels are where the money is. I’ve heard that many times. Novels take a while to write and a while to polish and package for publication. Not so with short stories. Short stories will get your name out there and keep it out there.

These are the five main perils of writing short fiction:

  1. Why waste a good idea on a short story? These days it’s all about writing novels. Give the readers what they want, over and over again. Build that brand. Make more money. Fine. If that’s what you want, go for it. Bear in mind there is much to be said for the art and craft of the short story. Hemingway’s “The Killers” and “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” remain vivid in my mind thirty-five years after I read them in high school.
  2. Short stories are often just one shots. That one shot might be brilliant, but then you have to go write another story. Is that one brilliant story continuing to earn royalties or selling well as a Kindle Single? I visit various writers’ groups online, and I find the emphasis on money to be disheartening. Short stories can be built into a novel. One of my favorite fantasy novels, A Bait of Dreams by Jo Clayton, started out as three short stories that appeared in Asimov’s.
  3. It can be difficult to pack a complex story idea into a limited word count. On the other hand, doing so can result in a stronger story. When I wrote “Fallen Idol,” my first short story sale, I got so caught up in all the research and characters and how-to books’ advice I thought I could rise to the challenge of writing a real novel. Fortunately, I had an attack of reality. All the research and ideas imploded, resulting in a much stronger short story.
  4. Unless you’re selling to the top professional markets, short fiction doesn’t pay much. If you’re sending out enough stories to generate an acceptable amount of sales, way to go! That’s not easy to do, even for the Big Names. I will say that anthologies that pay up front then give you a cut of the royalties can provide some worthwhile income.
  5. Here’s the Peril that cuts to the heart of what it means to be a writer. Are you going to write about what you want to write about, or are you going to write what you think will sell to the markets where you want your work to appear? The Digital Age has opened up a whole lot of  markets. They may not pay much. They may not pay at all. Still, you can get your words out there. Targeting a particular market is a perfectly reasonable career strategy. My first sale to Weird Tales was another day for joyful explosion.

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It comes down to those basic questions we all ask our main characters:

What do you want?

How badly do you want it?

What are you willing to give up in order to get it?

When you’ve answered these three questions, you will be on your way to navigating through the perilous process of telling the stories only you can tell.

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