#atozchallenge M is for Mentor


by Lillian Csernica on April 15, 2019

atoz2019m

One of the best things a writer can do is find a mentor.

Writing is a lonely business. We have to isolate ourselves, otherwise we’d never get any writing done. When it’s time to emerge from that productive isolation, it helps to have a supportive community of other writers. What helps even more is having a someone who’s been there and done that, who is doing it right now, and can offer support and advice about the process.

Joining a writers group can be one way of building a community and perhaps even finding a mentor. I discuss the pros and cons of writers groups here.

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Thotz.net

What can a writing mentor do for you?

Writing advice — The best way to find good guidance on how to improve your writing is to ask someone who has achieved at least some publishing success. Call me old-fashioned, but I respect the gatekeepers. Editors and publishers with established track records of professional success. Writers who have had fiction accepted by them have proven their level of skill. Both the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America and the Romance Writers of America have mentor programs. If you’re writing in these genres, give them a look.

Professional etiquette — This can encompass everything from how to approach publishers and agents to coping with the perils of volunteering for a writers workshop. The experience and perspective of a good mentor can alert you to pitfalls and make sure you present your best polished professional demeanor.

Marketing tips — Writers who have a sales record will most likely acquire some familiarity with the tastes of the editors to whom they send their fiction. This familiarity arises in part from the submission process, but it can also be informed by face time at conventions. Getting the inside scoop on marketing trends is a wonderful thing.

Coping with rejection — There are three basic stages: form rejection, checklist rejection, personalized rejection. Given the speed of submission managers and email replies, the odds have gone up somewhat in terms of getting actual comments on submissions. That being said, it still takes experience to read such comments and understand their meaning. I was overjoyed the first time I got a rejection from Fantasy & Science Fiction Magazine that included a comment about looking forward to seeing more stories from me.

Coping with success — This can be worse than rejection. Why? Because while success breeds success, it also breeds anxiety and pressure to perform. Not every idea will turn into a winner. It becomes a numbers game, which means a lot of hard work. In retail, I learned the 80 20 Rule, aka the Pareto Principle, which says 80% of your results will come from 20% of your activities. Having a mentor will help you learn how to spend your available writing time wisely.

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12 Comments

Filed under #atozchallenge, Blog challenges, Conventions, creativity, editing, fantasy, Fiction, Goals, publication, science fiction, Writing

12 responses to “#atozchallenge M is for Mentor

  1. Good job rising to the challenge! I just realized this was a THING. Hmmmm, maybe I’ll start today. I can do it! If I did NaNo over Thanksgiving, I can do this. Thanks for bringing it to my attention!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Just getting some informed encouragement can make a huge difference. I once had a much-published author tell me he was going to talk to me as one artist to another rather than teacher to student, and even though what he had to say on some fronts was discouraging, that preface made all the difference. And the fact is, we all need someone who will tell us the truth.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I need a mentor…I’m still only on K in #AtoZchallenge …hellllp

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Although I have built my writing community, I haven’t had the good fortune to find a mentor. So far. But I’d love to. Sometimes I really feel like I’m difting on in this industry, without a guide. It isn’t a geed feeling.

    Liked by 1 person

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